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    Raw Feeders out there?

    Does anyone do a raw diet and if so what do you feed? I've returned to it after noticing a lot of tartar on my puppy's teeth from feeding kibble and I think it's fantastic. But I'm always looking for ways to improve and better places and ways to source meat, currently I buy wholesale at about $100-140 every 2 months and if I smack a deer on the road, it goes in the freezer too. Any thoughts on raw feeding or general banter?

    #2
    I used to raise rabbits for meat, including dog food. Raw rabbit is great for dogs. They’re easy to kill and skin as well. You can keep the furs— some breeds have really soft fur. Standard rex rabbits for example, their fur is like velvet.

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      #3
      Originally posted by Moosekub View Post
      Does anyone do a raw diet and if so what do you feed? I've returned to it after noticing a lot of tartar on my puppy's teeth from feeding kibble and I think it's fantastic. But I'm always looking for ways to improve and better places and ways to source meat, currently I buy wholesale at about $100-140 every 2 months and if I smack a deer on the road, it goes in the freezer too. Any thoughts on raw feeding or general banter?
      I'm in eastern Europe, so I can't really help you, but I got a deal where I buy chicken necks, and stuff like that for really cheap.
      I also heard that some breeders make their stock from outdated meat from supermarkets, at least where I live. As you know, supermarket have to throw out their food 1-2 days before it really become bad.
      So some breeders had the idea to make a contract with some locals supermarket to buy this meat at like 0.50€/KG.
      I have to look at this &as it might be a nice source of meat to my girl, maybe you can do as well. Like i say, try it, it's free!

      Also, I give my girl half meat and half dry food, re hydrated, because, I'm afraid to forget something in her diet and make her have dietary problems.
      the vet I talk about it said it's okay as it is divided in two meals, one of raw meat in the morning, and one of re hydrated in the night.
      What are you thinking about this?
      If I made a fault in grammar, or in anything as English is not my native language, let me know please, as I want to write perfectly.

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        #4
        Originally posted by Alpaca View Post

        I'm in eastern Europe, so I can't really help you, but I got a deal where I buy chicken necks, and stuff like that for really cheap.
        I also heard that some breeders make their stock from outdated meat from supermarkets, at least where I live. As you know, supermarket have to throw out their food 1-2 days before it really become bad.
        So some breeders had the idea to make a contract with some locals supermarket to buy this meat at like 0.50€/KG.
        I have to look at this &as it might be a nice source of meat to my girl, maybe you can do as well. Like i say, try it, it's free!

        Also, I give my girl half meat and half dry food, re hydrated, because, I'm afraid to forget something in her diet and make her have dietary problems.
        the vet I talk about it said it's okay as it is divided in two meals, one of raw meat in the morning, and one of re hydrated in the night.
        What are you thinking about this?
        My dogs never seem to like dog food. They might nibble it if they are hungry, but generally they stop eating it or get sick halfway through the bag and so I gave up on it. I have been raw feeding 100%, with a 80% muscle 10% organ and 10%bone ratio. I also give raw pumpkin and probiotic yogurt once a week, eggs twice a week, green tripe 3 times a month and salmon oil or coconut oil daily. He seems to enjoy it but my costs seem a bit high. I definitely am going to look into dealing with the supermarkets and seeing what they offer. That's a fantastic idea.

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        • Alpaca
          Alpaca commented
          Editing a comment
          Then you're very welcome!
          I'd comeback to say what the local supermarket said me, we'll see!

        #5
        For a source of raw meat, depending on where you are , check with any local dairy farms it's quite common for calves not to survive for one reason or another and the farms usually just take them out to a place away from the barn and leave them for wild animals to feed on. And if you ask them to call you if a calf dies they more than likely would just let you take it for free or just a few dollars . A Holstein calf can be as much as 125 pounds or so ,and a jersey calf is usually between 50 to 60 pounds. Once you get it home you can cut it up and use almost every bit of it even the hooves dogs love chewing on them and they're high in protein

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          #6
          Originally posted by All4kont View Post
          For a source of raw meat, depending on where you are , check with any local dairy farms it's quite common for calves not to survive for one reason or another and the farms usually just take them out to a place away from the barn and leave them for wild animals to feed on. And if you ask them to call you if a calf dies they more than likely would just let you take it for free or just a few dollars . A Holstein calf can be as much as 125 pounds or so ,and a jersey calf is usually between 50 to 60 pounds. Once you get it home you can cut it up and use almost every bit of it even the hooves dogs love chewing on them and they're high in protein
          That's also a good idea; I will check it too, I have a lot of farms near me
          If I made a fault in grammar, or in anything as English is not my native language, let me know please, as I want to write perfectly.

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            #7
            I tried raw feeding for my dogs for a while, but it didnt work out so went back to premium quality kibble.
            I've always washed my dogs tooth two weeks interval so the tooth thing is not an issue.
            Last edited by Gigelina; 08-03-2019, 02:21 PM.

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              #8
              That
              Originally posted by All4kont View Post
              For a source of raw meat, depending on where you are , check with any local dairy farms it's quite common for calves not to survive for one reason or another and the farms usually just take them out to a place away from the barn and leave them for wild animals to feed on. And if you ask them to call you if a calf dies they more than likely would just let you take it for free or just a few dollars . A Holstein calf can be as much as 125 pounds or so ,and a jersey calf is usually between 50 to 60 pounds. Once you get it home you can cut it up and use almost every bit of it even the hooves dogs love chewing on them and they're high in protein
              That is genius! I am surrounded by farms, I will definitely reach out to some and see what they say. It never occured to me to ask. Thank you so much

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                #9
                As for "tartar-control",

                If you can get your hands on some RAW bones, their natural instinct to chew bones has the major benefit of "brushing their teeth", naturally. The tartar problem is from feeding dogs a very unnatural diet of unnatural foods! Unfortunately, the "pet-food industry" conveniently hides this very fact from the public, because it would cause them a huge loss of profits - as well as help make vet-trips less necessary.

                Beef and Pork bones (again, RAW) would work out best.

                - Pan
                There are times I wish to be as an animal, myself. Human life has become too complex, and sometimes very irritating.

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                  #10
                  Just to make cutting up raw meat easier go to Wal-Mart or Home Depot ect... And get a eletric chainsaw and instead of using bar and chain oil use vegetable oil it's place .a chainsaw can cut through the bones and all and when you're done with it just take the bar and chain off and wash it and the inside cover

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                  • arcticwolf69
                    arcticwolf69 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    battery sawzall (reciprocating saw) works wonders

                  #11
                  My girl is on a raw diet and it’s helped her out tremendously. Most folks in my area rarely buy dog food, hunters and farmers typically feed the dogs what the raise or shot long as it’s healthy. Beef and pork bones are good as are venison bones but you have to be careful with wild venison.

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                    #12
                    You can feed chicken as well but remove the bones first they're too brittle and they can choke on them and to get rid of the feather just pull the skin off and the feathers will go with it

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                      #13
                      Originally posted by RoughFucker40 View Post
                      My girl is on a raw diet and it’s helped her out tremendously. Most folks in my area rarely buy dog food, hunters and farmers typically feed the dogs what the raise or shot long as it’s healthy. Beef and pork bones are good as are venison bones but you have to be careful with wild venison.
                      I have fed wild venison a few times, what should i be wary of with it?

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                      #14
                      Thanks Pegasus, I was aware of the disease, but I'd be a liar if i said I was informed on it. I'll definently read up on it and adjust my habits if need be.

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                        #15
                        Yah, CWD is one of those nifty new(ly discovered?) prion diseases, similar to "Mad Cow Disease" AKA Crutzfeld(sp?)-Jakob Disease when it hits humans. They have linked mad cow and CJD as being the same thing, but as mentioned by pegasus, it's still relatively early days for CWD, and I haven't heard anything definitive about whether it's a species jumper. Another one to beware of in deer is "Blue Tongue Disease", AKA "Drunk Deer Disease", AKA "Staggers" - I only started hearing about that one a year or so ago. The only things I've heard about it to date that have been confirmed (at least enough that I take the info seriously) are that they've decided it is indeed a prion disease, it looks like it could be a deer-specific variant of Mad Cow, and it seems to be spreading outward from an initial focal point in northeastern Minnesota. Beyond that, everything about it seems to be educated guesswork. Including whether it is or isn't a species jumper.

                        Also, beware of failed calves from dairy herds - There's a reason they don't get sold off as veal for humans: Sickies get loaded with any number of drugs. The two I'm most familiar with are the wide-spectrum antibiotic SMZ/TMP, with a meat withdrawal time of between 30 and 90 days depending on whose regulations are being followed - It's a combination of sulfamethoxazole and Trimethoprin. I've personally taken it for bacterial infections - it's in the human USP, but you need to be wary of the potential for kidney damage at higher/longer term doses. The other is Phenylbutazone (AKA Bute or sometimes "Horse Aspirin") which is SUPPOSED TO BE totally forbidden in dairy cattle by federal law, since it's known beyond any question at all to transfer into milk, but sometimes gets used anyway. I've read in dead-tree trade mags aimed at folks in the bovine business that in at least some states, simply having a bottle of bute on the premises of a dairy operation is grounds for immediate shutdown and herd confiscation/destruction. Haven't heard of such draconian measures actually being employed, but apparently the option is available. It's legal in beef cattle, with a 60 day meat-withdrawal time. This one is an NSAID, same category as aspirin, ibuprofen (AKA Advil), and acetaminophen (AKA Tylenol here in the USA, or Paracetamol in Britain) Bute does get prescribed for humans occasionally, at much lower doses than in livestock, but last I heard, that was being officially discouraged. Never have bothered to chase up the details of why, though I suspect it's the same, but moreso, as for the other NSAIDs - namely, risk of gastric bleeding/ulcers and joint-bleeds, especially at higher doses, and a high potential for renal and hepatic (kidney and liver) damage.

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