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    For all who actually care about their health, and the health of their critters

    Zoonotics 101

    For all who actually care about their health, and the health of their critters

    Over my years here, I've noticed an increasing sense of unwillingness to believe that our little hobby can do anyone harm. Bestiality is one of the oldest expressed Paraphilias in the Human experience, if cave paintings are to be interpreted and believed. YET, the practices are one of the least-investigated by researchers, and the least Published about...Thus, knowledge is passed from person to person, or individuals research it themselves with little actual VERIFIED information available.

    Old wives' tales, tales of how they " Do it" in that country 'way over there>>>>>'( which was a technique used by Jonathan Swift in 1726 to illustrate what he could not accuse his neighbors of),poor information and fairy tales abound....well, we have to learn it somewhere...for myself, it was OJT and public libraries, because thats who I am. I would have thought the nonsense would be easier to dispell with the advent of the net, but all that seems to have happened is that a larger tower of babble on the topic now exists.

    Humans have a way of distancing themselves from inconvenient truths, much to their detriment. I cannot fix that. I can't dispell ALL the nonsense surrounding our practices as zoos and bestialists, much as I have tried; there's always some boob who thinks he knows better, no matter how true a statement is made or who makes it. But what I can do, I do...and this topic, Zoonotic Diseases, needs clarity and exposure for all who come here, for all our sakes...ostriches hide their heads in the sand...that's not because they want to get hammered by that famous Shaykh Djerbouti....it's FEAR...

    Listed below are links for various animals and the possible diseases they can bear and pass on to humans, including some that humans can pass from critter to critter. These links are from University websites with FULLY accredited extension services. Y'all can argue with me all you like....but you can't really argue with the people that are paid to KNOW what they're telling other people. Washington State and Cornell are two of the finest Universities in the US and have outstanding Animal Biology departments. Name your critter; it's probably here. I included those types of creatures which we don't really discuss here for the sake of knowledge...and perhaps for the sake of reasons why we DON'T mess with those.

    hxxps://iacuc.wsu.edu/zoonoses-associated-with-swine/

    hxxps://iacuc.wsu.edu/zoonoses-associated-with-dogs/

    hxxps://iacuc.wsu.edu/zoonoses-associated-with-horses/

    hxxps://iacuc.wsu.edu/zoonoses-associated-with-cattle/

    hxps://iacuc.wsu.edu/zoonoses-associated-with-birds/

    hxxps://ras.research.cornell.edu/care/documents/OHS/zoonosis_information_sheet_reptiles.pdf

    hxxps://iacuc.wsu.edu/zoonoses-associated-with-sheep-and-goats/



    Thanks to Enthrusted, whose post of the swine zoonotics site gave me the idea

    Thanks to Southie for reading it over for me......stay well, Compadre

    Originally posted by saddlebum66 on Beast Forum
    Last edited by dogluver101; 01-26-2019, 08:47 AM.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals."

    #2
    Valuable and extensive information ...Thank You Dogluver101

    Comment


      #3
      Good read, thank you for sharing your found knowledge....thank you Dogluver101

      Comment


        #4
        More people need to know about this! <3

        Comment


          #5
          Paid to know what they tell other people..

          Like the tobacco companies in the 1900s?
          Anyone who listens to Basicaly any government agency.. Within reason.. Is a sheep!

          Just look at human history!

          While some of their studies my be legit.

          I seriously doubt that heath agency's are paying people to contact and spread this or that with this or that animal.

          Just like aids came fr9m black guys fucking monkeys!! I know you have heard of that.

          And that is complete horse shit!! No pun!

          what needs to happen is a zoo needs to be the one involved in the research.. One that is qualified to do as such.

          Everyone is bias in one way or anouther.
          A true zoo however would have their animals health and their health in mind.

          Until that happens, take the info you get on the subject in mind.. And be safe.

          Doglover truly is an animal lover and Acctualy cares about other zoos... Cudos

          Comment


            #6
            the zoonoses are interesting, but transmissions are limited to external contacts or biting. i would love to see an article on risk vectors for intercourse with canids. i am smart enough to understand "fluid contact" could also include ejaculate, but let's face it: what we really want clarified are the risks of associated with a knot in the vagina.

            thank you for the links!

            Comment


              #7
              Thank you for the info!

              Comment


                #8
                When I wrote the above posted article( Dogluver101 merely copied it from B/F to here), it was, and remains, a group of links to treatises on various ZOONOSES, by species. It had then and still has now, NADA to do with intercourse or animal sex in general. Such transmissible diseases are NOT results of sex with critters, but of close proximity to critters. YES they are written by research departments of schools with Gov't research contracts. NO...the Gov't isn't making statements about Zoo-sex or its practitioners; the statements made are about HEALTH issues only. Disease transmission mechanisms are usually the first order of research, in the prevention of epidemics. If such research is NOT done, it leaves the general population wide open for new and potentially fatal problems. For the lady who'd like more health info regarding penetration, there probably isn't much, because thats a political hot potato with limited value in the health field. You could try researching and writing that article yourself.

                As to Aids, there were and remain many rumors and theories about how that virus jumped species. The theory that actually makes the most sense is that bush-meat HUNTERS in Congo and other sub-equatorial African Nations who carelessly skinned Green Monkeys( cutting themselves, and thus mingling their own blood with the monkey blood ) were the first to contract and spread Aids. The disease was known as specific to certain monkeys in the 70's. Given that all of those known species were quite small, the chances of intercourse with them is almost nil.

                And the fact is, if Politics had NOT raised its ugly-minded, mean-spirited head in that initial period, we'd have CURED aids by now. Assumptions on that level KILL people.
                Last edited by Saddlebum66; 07-31-2019, 07:14 PM.

                Comment


                • PansFriendOfTheForest
                  Editing a comment
                  "AIDS" actually started out as a "biowarfare research tool". The "media" and government was very irresponsible for not reporting the truth about its origins. AIDS has not been with mankind for longer than the 40 - 50 years it was known to exist.

                  Also, AIDS appeared rather suddenly on BOTH coasts of the United States AT THE SAME TIME. - This was also when an experimental batch of Hepatitis B vaccines were distributed and administered to members of the gay community. If you were alive to remember then, it first showed up in the gay community only. Then, it became commonplace with needle-sharing drug users. Again, the origin of AIDS pointed back to the contaminated Hepatitis B vaccines at that time.

                  Lyme disease is also another rather "novel" disease of the twentieth century. Until its "discovery", its existence was never known, nor recorded - even though people lived in those "affected areas" for at least two centuries, without the classic symptoms.

                  One must ask him/herself: Just WHERE did some of these newer diseases really come from?

                  However, because they are here now, it is up to prudence and commonsense to dictate how we best protect ourselves from them.

                  - Pan

                #9
                Thanks, Dogluver and Saddlebum, for taking the time to share this information.

                I recently started a public zoo twitter (whoops), and the misinformation about Zoonoses from BOTH sides of these (rather pathetic) fights is kind of unsettling.

                Also, thanks for clarifying that zoonoses are communicable from being in CLOSE PROXIMITY, not explicitly from sexual contact. Which means, friends, that if you find yourself or your animal partner sick, please do not be afraid to seek medical treatment! Medical professionals are not going to jump to the conclusion that you've been fucked by Fido or boinking Bessy. These things happen just from living in close quarters.

                It's a reminder of the importance of playing smart and making sure we take care of both ourselves and our partners!

                Comment


                  #10
                  Updating The Relevant: For those of you with canine partners East of the Mississippi, there has been a rise in the numbers of Lyme ticks( Ixodes species, known as Hard or seed Ticks), and a lesser known malady is spreading with them. Known as Powassan Virus, this is a dangerous-to-human disease. IF you live in an area where ticks are prevalent, use repellents(never more than 25% DEET) and protect your dog with an appropriate flea and tick system.
                  Powassan virus


                  What it is: Powassan (POW) virus, which is related to West Nile virus, is transmitted by the bite of an infected tick and cannot be spread directly from person to person.

                  Symptoms: People get sick from one week to a month after infection, but many do not develop any symptoms. Common signs include fever, headache, vomiting, weakness, confusion, loss of coordination, difficulty speaking, and seizures. POW virus is a serious disease and can cause inflammation of the brain or meningitis, which can lead to serious complications. There is currently no specific medicine designed to treat POW virus disease.

                  How common it is: Powassan virus is rare in the U.S. Only one case was reported each year between 2004 and 2006. However, that number jumped to 22 cases in 2016, the highest it has been in 13 years. Most cases have popped up in the Northeast or Great Lakes regions of the U.S.

                  Additionally, there is a potential bacterial disease that can be spread from a dog's saliva( and presumably other fluids) that can pass to humans, generally through open wounds.
                  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, capnocytophaga is a bacteria that lives in the mouths of dogs and cats. It is spread to people through bites and open scratches. This bacteria is known to cause SERIOUS Gangrene in a human's extremities. There are two cases, one in an Ohio Female, and one in a Wisconsin Male, that have hit the news in the past eighteen months, BOTH of which have resulted in amputations of feet and hands in the victims.
                  What It Is:
                  Many Capnocytophaga germs are normal bacteria commonly found in the mouths of people, dogs, and cats. These germs sometimes cause opportunistic infections, which means under the right conditions they can cause an infection, such as in a person with a weakened immune system.
                  People with weakened immune systems include those who:
                  • Drink alcohol excessively
                  • Have had their spleens removed
                  • Have HIV infection or cancer






                  People with these conditions should speak with their doctors about how to safely interact with cats and dogs.
                  The Capnocytophaga germs that are common in dogs and cats can be spread to people through a bite or after close contact with dogs or cats. Infections are more often linked to dog bites or dog contact.
                  See the Preventing Dog Bites page for information on how to prevent dog bites and what to do if you are bitten, regardless of your health status.
                  Other Capnocytophaga germs can also be found in human mouths and can cause illness in some people who have the bacteria in their own mouth. People who have weak immune systems get this type of infection more often than healthy people.
                  Most reported infections occur in tissues connected to the mouth and throat, including:
                  • Periodontal (gum) disease
                  • Respiratory tract infections (infections of the mouth, nose, throat, and lungs)
                  • Eye infections
                  In both types of infections—those that spread from animals or from oneself—the bacteria can enter the blood stream, which can lead to infection in various parts of the body. Infection can also cause the following:
                  • Septicemia (blood infection)
                  • Endocarditis (inflammation of the lining of the heart)
                  • Abscesses (collections of pus in the tissue that cause redness and swelling) in various body tissues
                  • Inflammation of the eyes, face, lymph nodes, or brain membranes
                  MOST contact with dogs and cats does not lead to a Capnocytophaga infection or any illness, even after a bite. But, you should take precautions if you have contact with animals, especially if you have a condition that puts you at higher risk of infection.



                  For the Horse owners and lovers among us, there's bad news for you as well. Eight states east of the River have reported cases of Eastern Equine Encephalitis, a mosquito-vectored disease, and in Delaware, it has been discovered to be reservoired in CHICKENS. This means that anyone in rural areas with a mosquito problem is at risk, even without horses around.

                  What it is: What is eastern equine encephalitis?


                  Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) is an extremely rare but serious and often fatal infection that causes encephalitis or inflammation of the brain. It is spread by the bite of a mosquito infected with EEE virus (EEEV). EEEV can also infect a wide range of animals including mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians. The spread of EEEV to mammals (including humans and horses) occurs through the bite of infected mosquitoes that feed on both birds and mammals.
                  Who gets eastern equine encephalitis?


                  Anyone can be infected with EEEV, especially if they live, work, or visit areas where EEEV is present. However, people over the age of 50 and younger than the age of 15 are at greatest risk for developing severe disease when infected with EEEV.
                  How is eastern equine encephalitis virus spread?


                  EEEV is maintained through a natural cycle between the Culiseta melanura mosquitoes and birds. The spread of EEEV to mammals (including humans and horses) occurs through the bite of certain infected mosquito species (i.e. Aedes, Coquillettidia, and Culex) that feed on both birds and mammals. EEE is only spread to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito. EEE is not spread person-to-person, people to animals, or animals to people.
                  What are the symptoms of eastern equine encephalitis and when do they appear?


                  It is possible that some people who are infected with EEEV will not develop any symptoms. Symptoms of EEEV infection typically appear 4-10 days after being bitten by an infected mosquito.

                  The type of symptoms usually depend on the age of the person. People over age 50 and younger than age 15 are at greatest risk for developing severe disease. Severe cases of EEE infection begin with the sudden onset of headache, high fever, chills, and vomiting that may progress into disorientation, seizures, encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), and coma. Approximately a third of patients who develop EEE die, and many of those who survive have mild to severe brain damage.

                  Back in my junior high days,in Ct., a classmate contracted EEE, and spent six months in the hospital. Another kid in a neighboring school district was not so lucky.

                  Again, Protect yourselves with repellents and stay out of known mosquito hatcheries....get rid of standing water around your homes and barns. Change water in troughs daily. Horses can die from this as well, so keep that in mind and take appropriate measures.

                  This is not a matter of Alarmisim, but an effort to make Knowledge Power.
                  Last edited by dogluver101; 08-09-2019, 10:53 PM.

                  Comment


                    #11
                    Thank you for showing us the truth. I appreciate your efforts.

                    Comment


                      #12
                      I must say,

                      Pretty decent list of animal (zootic) diseases and effects. I am very familiar with many of these relating to dogs and horses, with some familiarity to pig-related diseases.

                      Most of these, thankfully, are very preventable. I stress that cleanliness and hygiene, as well as maintaining healthy environments, AND proper feeding of the appropriate foods to the species (as in, as close to naturally healthy as doable) will help to prevent/curtail many of these problems.

                      As to the insect vectors, this does take some more work, but there are some preventative measures against them too.

                      All in all,

                      I believe our biggest concern, considering that humans have the most infectious disease problems (and "epidemics") of any species in Nature, is when sick or ailing people get intimately involved with animals - without regard to their own personal health - let alone the animals' health.

                      Therefore again,

                      Proper hygiene and good nutritional health are a MUST, if you are to help prevent spreading more infectious diseases.

                      I would also add,

                      If your animals spend a majority of their time outdoors (which is not necessarily a bad thing), then it is very crucial to be observant of their health and condition, especially when other animals (especially wild animals) are present.

                      This is all just basic commonsense care and prevention at work.

                      Good topic, and good research articles! :-))

                      - Pan
                      There are times I wish to be as an animal, myself. Human life has become too complex, and sometimes very irritating.

                      Comment

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